Nighthawks

1981

Nighthawks

6.3

An international terrorist has New York in a grip of panic and it's up to Det. Sgt. Deke DaSilva to take him down.

1978

Nighthawks

5.7

A gay teacher is forced to hide his sexuality by day while living his secret life by night, in Great Britain in the 1970's, not mixing his professional and private life, until the day comes when his students and his headmaster find out.

2009

Nighthawks

3.0

In this frenzied tale about passionate affairs, vicious cycles and fresh blood, a disillusioned older woman is trying to hide her true nature from the young girl she is dating.

1970

Nighthawks in Bangkok

0.0

Proy, a young waitress has always been curious about a worn-out drifter who often strolls into the cafeteria with no money. One night, seeing the drifter again lost in thought, Proy takes the courage to speak to him. She asks where he's from and why he's traveling. Seeing his lack of confidence in English, she plays a game on him - 'Speak in your own language and I'll listen.' The drifter begins to tell a story in a language she does not comprehend. As he reveals his unforgettable past about a woman he loved, he finds Pros with a reaction he had never expected...

1991

Strip Jack Naked

6.3

Ron Peck talks about his experiences of growing up as a gay man, the attitudes to homosexuality in Britain, and his journey towards making his film "Nighthawks" (1978).

Nighthawks
Nighthawks
Nighthawks
0.0

Nighthawks was an Irish television series broadcast on Network 2. It was hosted by Shay Healy. It was part of the major re-brand of RTÉ Two as Network 2 in 1988. The programme, which began broadcasting in the late 1980s, was a three times-weekly, late-night series. Nighthawks was produced for its first two seasons by David Blake-Knox. In its third season the series producer was Anne Enright, later to become a Booker Prize-winning novelist. In its final season, it was produced by Briain Mac Lochlainn. The Irish Film and Television Awards-nominated director Charlie McCarthy and producers David McKenna and Philip Kampf also worked on the programme. The show's signature tune was composed by Ronan Johnston. It also featured several contributory sketches from Nuala Kelly, Joe Taylor, and Orla McGovern. An early star of the series was Northern Irish comedian Kevin McAleer, who specialised in rambling but amusing monologues to camera. The Irish actor/comedian-turned British television presenter Graham Norton also appeared on Nighthawks early in his career. Nighthawks was produced by RTÉ Raidió Teilifís Éireann. The programme was documented in the first episode of the 2008 RTÉ television series reviewing Irish comedy, Boom! Boom! The Explosion of Irish Comedy. The Irish folk and contemporary singer Mary Black has remarked on her website on the programme's 1989 connection to her song "No Frontiers". When RTÉ Radio issued new rate cards covering the period from 20 December 1999 until 4 June 2000, it used the term "Nighthawks" to refer to the fourteen spot nighttime packages it was making available on RTÉ 2fm.

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